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BBSRC Sustainable Bioenergy Centre

Electron microscope cross-section of straw 

Non-edible waste from agriculture, such as straw, could be used in the future as a secure, green source of fuel without taking up land needed for growing food. Scientists from the BBSRC Sustainable Bioenergy Centre will be looking at this as one possible way to provide sustainable, environmentally friendly bioenergy replacements for fossil fuels.

Stained cross-section of plant stem 

The sugars locked away in the stems of plants would make excellent fuel for sustainable bioenergy. Research as part of the BBSRC Sustainable Bioenergy Centre will investigate how they could be unlocked for conversion into green bioenergy.

Stained cross-section of plant stem 

The sugars locked away in the stems of plants would make excellent fuel for sustainable bioenergy. Research as part of the BBSRC Sustainable Bioenergy Centre will investigate how they could be unlocked for conversion into green bioenergy.

The Gribble 

This tiny seawater pest can destroy wooden boats and piers but remarkably the gut enzymes that allow it to eat wood are being harnessed by scientists in the BBSRC Sustainable Bioenergy Centre to break down wood for conversion into green, sustainable bioenergy.

Miscanthus growing at Rothamsted Research 

Miscanthus is a fast growing grass which produces biomass very quickly, wihtout competing with the food chain. Research as part of the BBSRC Sustainable Bioenergy Centre will look at maximising the yield of Miscanthus for sustainable bioenergy production. Copyright: Rothamsted Research.

Energy crop research at Rothamsted Research 

The BBSRC Sustainable Bioenergy Centre aims to make sustainable, green bioenergy replacements for fossil fuels a reality. Optimising the yield of fast growing energy crops that are not part of the food chain is one way scientists aim to do this. Copyright: Rothamsted Research.

Willow research 

Willow is a promising energy crop that does not compete with the food chain. Research as part of the BBSRC Sustainable Bioenergy Centre will look at maximising the biomass yield of willow for sustainable bioenergy production. Copyright: Rothamsted Research.

Bioenergy from sea pests 

Remarkably the little marine wood borer, or Gribble, that caused this damage could hold the secret to sustainable energy for us all. The gut enzymes that allow the bug to damage wooden sea structures such as piers will be harnessed by scientists at the BBSRC Sustainable Bioenergy Centre to break down wood for sustainable bioenergy production.

Willow research 

Willow is a promising energy crop that does not compete with the food chain. Research as part of the BBSRC Sustainable Bioenergy Centre will look at maximising the biomass yield of willow for sustainable bioenergy production. Copyright: Rothamsted Research.

Harvested willow at Rothamsted Research 

Scientists working as part of the BBSRC Sustainable Bioenergy Centre will investigate how we can maximise the yield of non-food energy crops such as willow so that sustainable bioenergy replacements for fossil fuels become a reality. Copyright: Rothamsted Research.