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Appendix A6.1

Personal promotion – criteria

1. Knowledge, skills and experience
2. Benefit to the organisation
3. Performance and achievements to date
4. Potential
5. Equal opportunities guidance

Criteria for the assessment of nominations for personal promotion

A nomination for personal promotion will be assessed against the four criteria below. BBSRC welcomes nominations from all sections of the community irrespective of race, religion or belief, age, sexual orientation, sex, pregnancy or maternity, marriage or civil partnership or gender reassignment.

The Promotion Interview Panel and the local Personal Promotion Panel/Individual Excellence Board will take account of any information provided by the candidate which may indicate circumstances which have had a material impact on the individual’s ability to produce the expected number or quantity of work achievements, outputs and other indicators of esteem in the period in question.

1. Knowledge, skills and experience

The candidate must be able to demonstrate a commitment to continuing personal and professional development within the organisation; this can take the form of one or more of the following:

  • Striving for improved effectiveness, impact and productivity within their area of work
  • A willingness and capability to assume responsibility or leadership within their sphere of influence
  • Acquisition of valuable new skills and technical capability

In addition, the candidate must be able to demonstrate a strong record of innovation, impact and the delivery of beneficial change based on an individual contribution to the team or group in which they work

Evidence: This will primarily be demonstrated on the basis of the information provided in sections 7 and 10 of the nomination form (see appendix A6.2) and may be explored further by an interview panel.

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2. Benefit to the organisation

The line manager (or candidate in the case of self-nomination) must convincingly demonstrate the benefit to the organisation from having the candidate continuing to perform their current role, but at a higher grade, compared to encouraging the individual to seek promotion by moving to a new role at a more senior level.  The Panel will need to consider carefully the candidate’s current job description; this will be supplemented by a personal role evaluation showing how the job has changed under the influence of the candidate (see appendix A6.3).

Evidence: This will primarily be demonstrated through the Personal Role Evaluation Form (appendix A6.3) which sets out how the candidate has delivered a benefit to the organisation through a contribution which is over and above that expected of the current band,  and may be explored further by an interview panel.

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3. Performance and achievements to date

The candidate will need to demonstrate that they have consistently made a contribution in their sphere of activity which is well beyond that normally expected at their current Band. This will have been achieved through the development and application of knowledge, skills and experience. Several tangible examples of the candidate’s contribution which illustrate this level of performance, and which are commensurate with the higher grading, will need to be demonstrated.

Evidence: This will primarily be demonstrated on the basis of the documentation submitted by line management and the candidate (sections 7 and 10 of the nomination form and in particular the supporting appendices to the nomination), and may be explored further by an interview panel.

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4. Potential

The candidate will need to demonstrate that their high level of performance is likely to continue. The Panel will need to see examples of the future personal contribution that is going to be required of the candidate by their line management along with supporting information indicative of their capability to fulfil such expectations.

An appraisal of the candidate’s own ideas and plans for the way their work in the future will develop is an important aspect of the case for promotion, and must be consistent with what is expected of an individual operating at the higher grade.

Evidence: This will primarily be demonstrated on the basis of the submitted documentation (especially section 8 of the nomination form, appendix A6.2) and may be explored further by an interview panel.

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5. Equal opportunities guidance

Members of Personal Promotion Panels, Individual Excellence Board and Interview Panels should seek to make reasonable adjustments in their assessments of candidates, in order to maintain fairness. The following circumstances may be relevant and influence what might be expected of candidates operating under different circumstances:

Family and domestic matters, including:

  • Absence on maternity, paternity, parental or adoption leave and arrangements on return to work following these periods of leave
  • Part-time working or other flexible working arrangements
  • Time spent acting as a carer or other domestic commitments

Disability, ill-health and injury, including:

  • Any disability to which the Equality Act 2010 applies
  • Absence from work on the advice of a registered medical practitioner

Absences from active work, which might include:

  • Career breaks or other absences which the institution is legally obliged to permit, such as absence for religious observance or absence arising out of involvement as a representative of the workforce

These and other personal circumstances may have had an impact on an individual's activity in the period concerned. For example:

  • Achievements and productivity: a candidate's circumstances may have resulted in their productivity being lower than that of their peers. In regard to quantity of outputs / achievements, where appropriate a pro rata evaluation should be made - for example, to take account of career breaks, or part-time working, due to caring or family commitments.
  • Professional reputation: a candidate's circumstances may have resulted in their being unable to accept invitations to meetings and opportunities offered - for example, due to caring or family commitments.
  • Leadership: a candidate's circumstances may lead to working patterns which have resulted in less opportunity to take on managerial roles, thus less opportunity to demonstrate all aspects of leadership. If necessary, suitable questions can be posed at interview to assess leadership aptitude, and actual experiences explored to assess ability.

In addition, Panels will wish to be mindful of health and safety restrictions imposed on pregnant and nursing women which may have prevented them from undertaking some types of activity during the assessment period.

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Last updated 31/03/2014
Amendment 173 - March 2014