External links

Share this page:
Other services (opens in new window)
Sets a cookie

Link between immune system and mammary gland could shed new light on breast cancer

5 July 2007

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have published new research today in the journal Development showing an unexpected link between a fundamental part of the immune system and the cells that produce milk in the breast during lactation.

The researchers, funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), found that cytokines, which have a central role in immune response, are used in the breast to promote the production of milk producing cells. The finding has implications for understanding breast cancer as cells that respond incorrectly to cytokine signalling can grow out of control and become cancerous.

When the body needs to fight infection it makes specific cells that respond to the invading organism. These cells are either T helper Type 1 to fight a virus or T helper Type 2 to attack a parasite. Once made each type of T cell releases cytokine molecules to promote more of its own kind to help the body’s immune response. The Cambridge researchers have shown that during pregnancy the mammary gland uses this system to enhance the growth of milk producing cells.

The breast uses Type 2 T helper cytokines as a signal to get resting mammary duct cells to begin dividing and differentiating to produce large numbers of milk-producing cells. These cells then release more cytokine molecules to get the body to make yet more milk producing cells. Using a mouse model, the scientists were able to conclusively demonstrate the role of the Type 2 cytokines. When the signalling molecules were not present, production of milk producing cells was vastly reduced.

Dr Walid Khaled from the University’s Department of Pathology conducted the research. He explains: “This really was an unexpected discovery. Up until now we thought that breast development was controlled by just steroid and peptide hormones. The discovery of this role played by aspects of the immune system will open up new avenues for examining the development of breast cancer, particularly in women who have just had a baby, a time when there is a greater risk of breast cancer.”

Dr Khaled’s research demonstrates the importance of investigating basic biology in order to better understand disease. Dr Christine Watson leads the research group at the University of Cambridge. She comments: “The breast undergoes tremendous and amazing changes during and after pregnancy. The body generates milk producing cells using signalling mechanisms adopted from the immune system and once a child is weaned these cells die and the mammary gland returns to its pre-pregnant state. It is vital that we understand the processes involved as it is when these normal developmental events go wrong that we are at risk of cancer developing.”

ENDS

Notes to editors

The research is published today ePress in the journal Development, doi: 10.1242/dev.003194.

Dr Khaled’s PhD studentship and this project were funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council. The research was also supported by the Medical Research Council (MRC), UK and National Health and Medical Research Council, Australia.

About BBSRC

The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) is the UK funding agency for research in the life sciences. Sponsored by Government, BBSRC annually invests around £380 million in a wide range of research that makes a significant contribution to the quality of life for UK citizens and supports a number of important industrial stakeholders including the agriculture, food, chemical, healthcare and pharmaceutical sectors. http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk

About MRC

The Medical Research Council is dedicated to improving human health through excellent science. It invests on behalf of the UK taxpayer. Its work ranges from molecular level science to public health research, carried out in universities, hospitals and a network of its own units and institutes. The MRC liaises with the Health Departments, the National Health Service and industry to take account of the public's needs. The results have led to some of the most significant discoveries in medical science and benefited the health and wealth of millions of people in the UK and around the world. http://www.mrc.ac.uk

Images

Cytokine receptors highlighted on the surface of the mammary duct (449 KB)

Click on the thumbnail below to view and download full-size image.

Larger Image

The image is protected by copyright law and may be used with acknowledgement of Dr Walid Khaled.

External contact

Dr Walid Khaled, University of Cambridge

tel: 01223 333541

Dr Christine Watson, University of Cambridge

tel: 01223 333725

Tim Holt, University of Cambridge Communications

tel: 01223 332300

Contact

Matt Goode, Head of External Relations

tel: 01793 413299
fax: 01793 413382

Tracey Jewitt, Media Officer

tel: 01793 414694
fax: 01793 413382