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Winners announced – Knit-a-bug: The Great British Bioscience Knitting Competition

Copyright: BBSRC
Highlights from: 20 years of bioscience
  • Knitted nasties from around the UK have been flooding in for Knit-a-bug: The Great British Bioscience Knitting Competition
  • The winner – "Sam and Ella Sandwich" astounded the judging panel made up of scientists and knitters alike
  • Winning and shortlisted entries will be on display at the Great British Bioscience Festival, 14-16 November, Museum Gardens, Bethnal Green, London

As part of the Great British Bioscience Festival London, BBSRC asked knitters from across the country to pick up their needles and get creative with bioscience. Amongst the entries received were some of the world's most fearsome bacteria and viruses that can impact human and animal health such as bovine TB, Ebola, HIV and C. diffiicile.

Over 30 amazing entries made it to the shortlist, and now three lucky winners have been decided by an expert panel of judges. Overall winner Lynette Brocklehurst was the judges' favourite for her unique render of Salmonella – in the guise of a sandwich.

Winning kudos from the judges, Alison Hogg and Michele Clare gained points for their scientific accuracy, and scooped our runners-up prizes.

1st Prize

"Sam and Ella Sandwich" – Lynette Brocklehurst

Copyright: Lynette Brocklehurst
Copyright: Lynette Brocklehurst

The last thing you might expect to find in your sandwich is "Sam and Ella" (Salmonella). This nasty bug causes salmonellosis, a common foodborne disease with symptoms of fever, diarrhoea and vomiting. Eating contaminated foods such as raw eggs and green vegetables is the main route of transmission, but proper preparation such as washing and correct cooking can help to minimise risk.

Runner-up

E.coli” – Alison Hogg

Copyright: Alison Hogg
Copyright: Alison Hogg

E.coli is a bacteria found in the intestines of both humans and animals. There are however, a number of strains of E.coli which can cause serious infections such as gastroenteritis and urinary tract infections. This creative interpretation of E.coli has been knitted using dpn's and then felted. Alison used the i-cord technique, and embroidered personalised features on to the bacteria.

Runner-up

“Biofilm containing Streptococcus, Listeria and Virbrio” – Michele Clare

Copyright: Michele Clare
Copyright: Michele Clare

Group B Streptococcus (dark blue), Listeria (yellow) and Virbrio (teal) - a variety of bacteria that can cause foodborne infections of varying severity.

Head judge, Simply Knitting Magazine's Kirstie McLeod commented: "All of the entries to the competition were really good fun. Everyone did a fantastic job and we were so impressed with the knitting skill and scientific knowledge demonstrated. We had a good few giggles judging these knitted germs, but we learnt about biology too."

Bacterial scientist Professor Vyv Salisbury from the University of the West of England who sat on the judging panel said: "Judging the Knit-a-bug competition has been a great experience - it's wonderful to see some really creative microbiology. With so many amazing entries it was not easy to pick a winner."

Professor Melanie Welham, BBSRC's Science Director said: "The competition has been a great opportunity to showcase interesting perspectives on the range of world-leading bioscience we fund in the UK, relevant to both human and animal health. The fantastic entries, prized for their inventiveness and scientific accuracy will be showcased for the public to view at our festival later this week."

The winning entries, along with 30 shortlisted entries will be on display at the Great British Bioscience Festival London, 14-16 November, Museum Gardens, Bethnal Green, London.

Follow the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #GBbioscifest.

ENDS


Tags: 20 years of bioscience microbes people news