Science in society:

Nature’s factories

Nature's factories. Eva Thuenemann, Institute of Food Research
From left; George Lomonossoff, Molly Barrett, Cathie Martin and Anne Osbourn, discussing the festival stand design. Image: John Innes Centre
From left: George Lomonossoff, Molly Barrett, Cathie Martin and Anne Osbourn, discussing the festival stand design.
Image: John Innes Centre

The team

From the John Innes Centre:

The science behind the exhibit

Human evolution is closely linked to our use of plants for food and building materials and we have harnessed a rich array of plant products to improve our lives, including flavours, fragrances, agrochemicals and medicines. Only 8% of the >400,000 known plant species have been chemically characterised, giving enormous potential for discovery of new plant-derived products. Extracting compounds from plants can be difficult; their complex structures mean making them chemically is often unachievable. Our research focuses on the development of faster discovery pathways and platforms combining biological and chemical synthesis to generate large quantities of high-value compounds in sustainable ways.

What to expect

Video

  Natural products

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Images

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Nature's factories: Cancer treatment (PDF 2.89MB)

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Nature's factories: Making vaccines (PDF 2.49MB)

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Nature's factories: Purple tomato (PDF 3.49MB)

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Nature's factories: Super broccoli (PDF 2.89MB)

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