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Food security news

The group of chemical insecticides known as neonicotinoids have been identified as presenting a serious risk to bee populations, leading to bans on their use. But at least one may be unfairly named among the offenders when it comes to risks to bumblebees, according to new research led by the University of Dundee.


Scientists at the JIC and TSL have pioneered a new gene-detecting technology which, if deployed correctly could lead to the creation of a new elite variety of wheat with durable resistance to disease. Working with fellow scientists at TSL, Dr Brande Wulff from the JIC developed the new technology called ‘MutRenSeq’ which accurately pinpoints the location of disease resistance genes in large plant genomes and which has reduced the time it takes to clone these genes in wheat from 5 to 10 years down to just two. 


A team of scientists from The Sainsbury Laboratory (TSL) and The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC) have developed a new method to accelerate isolation of plant disease resistance genes. The team have also identified a brand new source of blight resistance genes in Solanum americanum, a wild relative of the potato.


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