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Food security news

An international team of scientists has described precisely how a plant can sense a pathogen. “We know that plants have sensors to detect pathogens but we knew little about how they work,” says Professor Banfield from the John Innes Centre.


The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC), with partners in the UK, Colombia and Kenya bring together their leading expertise in forage breeding for animal nutrition, cutting-edge genomics and phenomics technologies to accelerate the improvement of Brachiaria, a vital livestock feed crop in central Africa and Latin America. More than 80 per cent of the world’s agricultural land is for grazing to support the ever increasing demand for meat and milk for an expanding and growing urban population, while boosting the income of rural families.


As part of the Newton Fund, TGAC has been awarded over £50,000 by The British Council to develop advanced bioinformatics capabilities for next-generation rice genomics in Vietnam to aid precision breeding for improvement of this staple crop by exploring 48 local rice varieties. As the second-largest global exporter, Rice is the most important agricultural commodity of Vietnam.


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